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Showing posts from May, 2012

The science of marriage success then and now

"The April 1924 issue of Science and Invention magazine ran an article by Hugo Gernsback, the magazine’s publisher, which examined the different “scientific” ways to determine if a marriage will succeed or fail." See highlights in  http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/paleofuture/2012/05/mechanical-matchmaking-the-science-of-love-in-the-1920s/ The body odor test sounds quite bizarre, but you have to realize that in the 1920s deodorants were not available in drug stores.

For better accuracy in prediction marriage success, look into the work of the most recognized expert in the field today, John Gottman.  See http://kallahmagazine.blogspot.com/2012/10/marriages-may-be-made-in-heaven-but.html

Visit my site http://kallahmagazine.weebly.com/

Sight on the sea on May 23

OpSite arrives in New York for a week. See http://www.examiner.com/article/opsail-new-york-may-23-may-30

Follow me on Twitter @AriellaBrown and circle me at Google+ For wedding tips and insight, as well as recipes and practical advice, visit www.kallahmagazine.com

Inspired by real life mail

http://www.examiner.com/article/the-problem-with-wedding-registries

Follow me on Twitter @AriellaBrown and circle me at Google+ For wedding tips and insight, as well as recipes and practical advice, visit www.kallahmagazine.com

Divrei Chaim: be all that you can be -- not an ad for the army

Divrei Chaim: be all that you can be: The gemara (Kesubos 62) relates the famous story of R' Akiva: R' Akiva was a shepherd who worked for Kalba Savu'a. Kalba Savu'a daughter R...
For more on Lag B'Omer see http://www.examiner.com/article/lag-b-omer and
http://www.examiner.com/article/lag-b-omer-cedarhurst

Memory and writing

Torah she ba'al peh was intended to be passed down orally. It was only due to the fear of it being forgotten that it was committed to writing, first only the Mishna and then the Gemara, and then many sifrei halacha that continue to multiply.  


Maria Konnikova looks at the Zeigarnik effect in a blog written for Scientific American,  She explains as the follows:
Psychologist Arie Kruglanski calls this a Need for Closure, a desire of our minds to end states of uncertainty and resolve unfinished business. This need motivates us to work harder, to work better, and to work to completion. It adds impetus to minds that may otherwise be too busy or oversaturated to bother with the details. That wold fit in with the Chazal "ayn simcha kehataras sfekos" There is no happiness like the resolution of uncertainty. The human mind longs for certainty, and the lack of it prevents it from rest, contentment. But that is also what feeds the thrill of the chase and the persistence to acquire th…